Bi-wireing, and why we do it.

Here, at Alacrity Audio Limited, we take our music very seriously. As part of this, we’ve examined every step of the hi-fi chain and, though it can’t be said that the loudspeaker cable is an ignored component, we do think that it is tragically misunderstood.

It simply is not sufficient to attempt to lower the impedance between loudspeaker and amplifier to vanishingly low levels, and trying only breaches limits in terms of bulk, taste or costs. Better still to work with the problems and side-step them when they arise.

It is a simple plain statement of fact that when a current is flowing in a conductor, a potential voltage is present, relative to the impedance of the conductor and the current flowing through it. So, what happens when you throw a bass signal down the wire? The current flows down the positive wire (during the +ve part of the waveform) producing a tiny voltage drop towards the speaker, then it flows through the crossover and bass unit (producing a relatively large voltage drop) and finally passes through the earth/return conductor again producing a tiny voltage drop. In a single wire feed-return, this means that the tweeter’s earth is effected!

If a tiny delicate tweeter signal is present, it may be modulated or even overwhelmed by this shifting earth reference.

Such is the quality of our Caterthun series of loudspeakers that this distortion is immediately noticeable. That is why we do not supply links for our loudspeaker connections. Each section (bass + tweeter) is electrically isolated and should be driven as separate systems with their own dedicated loudspeaker cables, if not their own dedicated amplifiers.

We want you to get ‘the most’ out of your music!

About Alacrity Audio

Designed and built in the UK, Alacrity Audio’s loudspeaker systems offer unbelievable sound quality in convenient close-to-wall designs.
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